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Sex Differencse in Response to Stress

By December 15, 2007

Brain research is starting to highlight that the pattern of neurological activity that happens during a stressful situation is different for men and women. It appears that men often have a more enhanced "fight or flight" response and women can have more of what researchers call "tend and befriend", which they chalk up to evolutionary differences. For people with generalized anxiety disorder, this may mean that the ways that we are pulled to cope with stress as men and women may differ, even if the symptoms are the same.
Comments
December 24, 2007 at 9:50 pm
(1) roger says:

This seems a small group of participants, but maybe differences were profound enough to draw conclusions.
I’d be interested to learn how homosexual people would fare in this kind of study.

is this true? I wonder how aware men are of their own depression in comparison to women.
I’d also be interested to know how willing men may be to acknowledge and disclose feelings of depression.

December 24, 2007 at 9:53 pm
(2) roger says:

(I posted the above, but the system ignored an included quote. I’m reposting differently! to make more sense)
This seems a small group of participants, but maybe differences were profound enough to draw conclusions.
I’d be interested to learn how homosexual people would fare in this kind of study.

”’Women have twice the rate of depression and anxiety disorders compared to men,’ notes Dr. Wang.”

is this true? I wonder how aware men are of their own depression in comparison to women.
I’d also be interested to know how willing men may be to acknowledge and disclose feelings of depression.

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